Other Knee Injuries

Oakland Regional Hospital orthopaedic surgeons are skilled at treating these and many other injuries to the knee. While some injuries can be treated with bracing, using crutches, anti-inflammatories, ice and rest, others will require surgery. Your Oakland Regional Hospital orthopaedic surgeon will help you determine the best course of treatment for your injury and your lifestyle. Consult an Oakland Regional Hospital orthopedist for examination or a second option for any of the following knee injuries:

Knee Articular Cartilage Injury

Articular or hyaline cartilage is an extremely smooth, hard material, made up of the protein collagen, which lies on a bone’s articulating surfaces (those surfaces that come into contact with other bones). Its function is to allow for the smooth interaction between two bones in a joint.

Osteochondral Fractures in the Knee

An osteochondral fracture is a tear of the cartilage which covers the end of a bone, within a joint. This is common in the knee joint, especially in association with other injuries such as ACL tears. Osteochondral fractures of the ankle are also common.

Lateral Cartilage Tear

Each knee joint has two crescent-shaped cartilage menisci. These lie on the medial (inner) and lateral (outer) edges of the upper surface of the tibia (shin) bone, also known as the tibial plateau. They are essential components, acting as shock absorbers for the knee as well as allowing for the proper interaction and weight distribution between the tibia and the femur (thigh bone). As a result, injuries to either meniscus can lead to critical impairment of the knee itself.

Medial Cartilage Meniscus Injury

Each knee joint has two crescent-shaped cartilage menisci. These lie on the medial (inside) and lateral (outside) of the upper surface of the tibia (shin) bone. They are essential components of the knee, acting as shock absorbers as well as allowing for the proper interaction and weight distribution between the tibia and the femur (thigh bone). As a result, injury to either meniscus can lead to critical impairment of the knee itself.

Patellar Dislocation

The patella, or kneecap, is the protective bone which lies in front of the knee joint. The patella bone glides up and down a groove (called the patellofemoral groove) at the front of the thigh bone (femur) as the knee bends.

Dislocated Knee

A dislocated knee is where the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (shin bone) are moved apart. This is different to a patella (kneecap) dislocation, and is a far more serious injury.

Lateral Cartilage Tear

Each knee joint has two crescent-shaped cartilage menisci. These lie on the medial (inner) and lateral (outer) edges of the upper surface of the tibia (shin) bone, also known as the tibial plateau. They are essential components, acting as shock absorbers for the knee as well as allowing for the proper interaction and weight distribution between the tibia and the femur (thigh bone). As a result, injuries to either meniscus can lead to critical impairment of the knee itself.

Medial Cartilage Meniscus Injury

Each knee joint has two crescent-shaped cartilage menisci. These lie on the medial (inside) and lateral (outside) of the upper surface of the tibia (shin) bone. They are essential components of the knee, acting as shock absorbers as well as allowing for the proper interaction and weight distribution between the tibia and the femur (thigh bone). As a result, injury to either meniscus can lead to critical impairment of the knee itself.

Fracture of the Tibial Plateau of the Knee

The tibial plateau is the upper surface of the tibia or shin bone. It is prone to becoming fractured in high velocity accidents such as those associated with skiing, horse riding and certain water sports.

The orthopaedic surgeons at Oakland Regional Hospital perform knee replacement and treat many knee injuries and conditions. If you are experiencing knee pain, discomfort, or a decrease in function or range of motion, click below make an appointment for a consultation. Or, call the Appointment Hotline at (248) 423-8484.